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Top 10 English Idioms for Ship Mate

visibility 206 views calendar_month Dec 14, 2023
publisher-humix
englishteststore.net
Top 10 English Idioms for Ship Mate 1. All hands on deck This idiom is used to indicate that everyone's help or participation is needed for a particular task or situation. It originated from the practice of calling all the sailors to the deck during emergencies or important operations. 2. Smooth sailing When things are going smoothly without any problems or obstacles, we use this idiom. It refers to a calm and trouble-free journey on a ship, where the waters are calm and the wind is favorable. 3. On the same boat If two or more people are in the same boat, it means they are facing the same situation or problem. This idiom draws a parallel between the shared experience of being on a boat and facing the same challenges. 4. Steer clear of To steer clear of something means to avoid it. The phrase comes from the nautical term 'steer,' which means to control the direction of a ship. So, when you steer clear of something, you are actively avoiding it. 5. Shipshape When something is shipshape, it means it is in perfect order or condition. Sailors often use this term to describe a ship that is well-maintained and organized. 6. Anchors aweigh This phrase is used to signal that the anchor of a ship is about to be lifted, and the ship is ready to set sail. It is often used metaphorically to indicate the beginning of a new journey or adventure. 7. Three sheets to the wind If someone is three sheets to the wind, it means they are extremely drunk. The phrase originated from the nautical term 'sheet,' which refers to the ropes that control the sails. If three of these sheets are loose, the ship becomes unsteady, just like a drunk person. 8. Batten down the hatches This idiom is used to mean preparing for a difficult or challenging situation. In sailing, when the weather is stormy, sailors secure the hatches (openings) with battens (wooden strips) to prevent water from entering the ship. 9. Show someone the ropes To show someone the ropes means to teach or guide them about a particular task or job. The phrase originated from the practice of teaching new sailors about the various ropes and their functions on a ship. 10. Jump ship If someone jumps ship, it means they abandon a project, organization, or team when they sense trouble or foresee failure. The phrase refers to the act of deserting a ship before it sinks or encounters a major problem.
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